Terminu vārdnīca

Overactive Bladder Symptoms

Anaesthesia (general, spinal, or local)

Before a procedure you will get medication to make sure that you don’t feel pain. Under general anaesthesia you are unconscious and unaware of what is happening to you. Under spinal or local anaesthesia you will not feel pain in the part of your body where the procedure is done. Anaesthesia wears off gradually after the procedure.


Organ which collects urine from the kidneys.


A hollow flexible tube to insert or drain fluids from the body. In urology, catheters are generally used to drain urine from the bladder.


A type of endoscope which is used in the urethra (see also Endoscope, Urethra).


The doctor and nurses do a series of tests to understand what causes your symptoms.


A tube-like instrument to examine the inside of the body. Can be flexible or rigid.


Two bean-shaped organs in the back of the abdomen that filter the blood and produce urine.


Lower urinary tract symptoms. A term used for the symptoms caused by BPE which can also point to other diseases affecting the urinary tract (see also Urinary tract).


Waking up one or more times during the night because of the need to urinate.

Peripheral oedema

Oedema means swelling. Peripheral oedema refers specifically to swelling of the ankles and legs.


The tube which carries urine from the bladder and out of the body.


The sudden need to urinate which is difficult to postpone.

Urinary frequency

The need to urinate more often than usual, generally more than 8 times a day.

Urinary incontinence

Involuntary loss of urine.

Urinary retention

When you are unable to urinate. This condition can be chronic.