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Penis cancer

What is penis cancer? Cancer is abnormal cell growth in the skin or organ tissue. When this cell growth starts in the penis, it is called penis cancer or penile cancer. Penis cancer is rare and affects less than 1% of men in Europe. It is more common in men older than age 40, but

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Treatment of penis cancer

This section offers general information. Your specific treatment will be recommended by your doctor based on your individual needs. Individual recommendations may depend on your country and health care system. The treatment you have will depend on: what you prefer what your doctor thinks is best for your type of cancer which treatments are available

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Cancers

Urologic cancers are a collection of diseases related to the genitourinary system of both men and women. These diseases are caused by cells that no longer work properly. These abnormal cells grow uncontrolled in the body. Read more about what cancer is on the page 'What is cancer?'. On this website you will find reliable

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Testicular cancer

What is testicular cancer? The testicles (also called the “testes”) are part of the male reproductive system (Fig. 1). They are found in the scrotum—the pouch of skin that hangs below the penis. The testicles make testosterone and sperm. Testicular cancer is a growth called a tumour that starts in the testicle (Fig. 2) and

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Primary urethral cancer

What is primary urethral cancer? You have been diagnosed with primary urethral cancer. This means you have a cancerous growth (malignant tumour) in your urethra. The urethra carries urine out of the body from the bladder, also known as urinary bladder. In men, the urethra runs through the prostate and the penis (Fig. 1). In women,

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Treatment for men with localised urethral cancer

Partial urethrectomy Partial urethrectomy: If your cancer is limited to the part of the urethra nearest the opening, but still close to the tip, partial removal of the urethra (urethrectomy) with penile preservation may be the best option. Your doctor might also recommend removal of enlarged lymph nodes to rule out metastasis. The main goal

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Leaflets

Urologic conditions Download information for patients about urologic conditions. Click on the links below to read or download the patient information leaflet. Benign prostatic enlargement Bladder cancer Congenital Malformation in the Urinary Tract Cryptorchidism Erectile dysfunction Kidney cancer Kidney and ureteral stones Male hypogonadism Male infertility Nocturia Overactive bladder syndrome Penile curvature Penis cancer Phimosis

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Treatments

There are numerous treatments for urologic cancers and other diseases. On this page you will find an overview of the treatments from A-Z and the treatments per disease. Go directly to Treatments A-Z Treatments per disease Treatments A-Z A Ablation therapy  Active surveillance  Anti-androgen therapy  Anti-angiogenic therapy Autologous Fascial Sling  Artificial compression devices in men 

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Radiation therapy

What is radiation therapy? Radiation therapy is well-established as a treatment for cancer. High-energy radiation is used to destroy cancer cells. It can be done with external beam radiation therapy or internal radiation therapy, also called brachytherapy. Usually, no numbing medication (anaesthesia) is needed for radiation therapy. External beam radiation therapy is a treatment option

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Male infertility

What is male infertility? Male infertility means not being able to father children. Infertility is the inability of a sexually active, non-contracepting couple to achieve spontaneous pregnancy in one year. If the cause of the fertility problem is found in the man, this is male infertility. Male infertility is found in approximately half of all childless

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Male hypogonadism

What is male hypogonadism? Male hypogonadism means the testicles do not produce enough of the male sex hormone testosterone. When levels are low, men might have decreased sex drive, less muscle mass, erectile dysfunction, and fatigue. Hypogonadism has a negative effect on organ function and quality of life. Testosterone is responsible for male reproductive and

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Erectile dysfunction

What is erectile dysfunction? Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common male sexual disorder. It is the inability to get or keep an erection that allows for satisfying sexual activity. It can happen occasionally or regularly, with or without any clear reason. Some men with ED are not able to get an erection at all. ED

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Benign prostatic enlargement

What is the prostate? The prostate is a gland located in the lower urinary tract, under the bladder and around the urethra (Fig. 1). Only men have a prostate. It produces the fluid which carries semen. The prostate has smooth muscles which help to push out the semen during ejaculation. A healthy prostate is about

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Cryptorchidism or undescended or hidden testicles

What is cryptorchidism? The failure of the testicles (or “testes”) to descend into the scrotum (the skin sac below the penis) is called “cryptorchidism”. It is also called having hidden or undescended testicles. The condition is generally uncommon but often affects boys born prematurely. As a male foetus grows, the testicles appear in the abdomen

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Penectomy

If a tumour has grown into surrounding tissue, removing it surgically is the best chance of cure. If the tumour is in your penis tissue, some or all of your penis might need to be removed to get rid of the cancer. A recommendation of penectomy raises many questions. Talk with your doctor about your

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Radical prostatectomy

What is radical prostatectomy? Radical prostatectomy is the removal of the entire prostate and the seminal vesicles. For radical prostatectomy you will receive general anaesthesia. Discuss with your doctor the advantages and disadvantages of radical prostatectomy and if it is right for you. Who are candidates for radical prostatectomy? Benign prostate enlargement (BPE) Because transurethral

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Urinary diversions

After removal of your bladder (cystectomy), you’ll need a new way to store and pass urine without a bladder. To do this, your surgeon will create a urinary diversion. The three most commonly used urinary diversions are discussed: The ileal conduit (with urostoma) The neobladder (with internal urine pouch) Rerouting ureters through the skin (ureterocutaneostomy)

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Cystectomy

The mainstay of treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is surgical removal of the urinary bladder. Your doctor has several reasons for recommending removal of the whole bladder: Presence of a muscle-invasive tumour Presence of a tumour that grows aggressively (high grade), that has multiple cancerous areas (multifocal), or that is superficial, but has recurred after

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Side effects of radiotherapy

Side effects during treatment Radiotherapy affects people in different ways, so it's difficult to predict exactly how you will react. Some people have only mild side effects but for others the side effects are more severe. Some of the main side effects are explained below. Tiredness and weakness Most people feel tired while they are

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