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What is cancer?

What is cancer? Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells. Usually, every cell has a certain function in the body. Cancer is caused by cells that no longer work properly. Uncontrolled cell growth can crowd out other cells and become a tumour (Fig. 1). Fig. 1: Cancer cells crowding out healthy cells. Types of

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Fatigue in Prostate Cancer

The Patient Office published a paper in European Urology "Fatigue in Prostate Cancer: A Roundtable Discussion and Thematic Literature Review." Understanding the specific health needs of individual patients and their desired health outcomes is essential to identifying personalised strategies for minimising fatigue. Abstract Context: Cancer and its treatments cause fatigue in up to 90% of

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Radiotherapy for Localised Penile Cancer

Home Treating Early Penile Cancer Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for Advanced Penile Cancer Surgery Clinical Trials Radiation therapy is the use of high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. It can be directed at cancer from outside of the body (external beam radiotherapy) or from within the body (brachytherapy). Both types of radiotherapy can be used to

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About the Testicles and Testicular Cancer

Home Risk Factors and Diagnosis Treatments Living with Recurrence The Testicles The testicles (or testes) are the male sex glands which produce sperm and testosterone, the male sex hormone. They are located outside of the body in the scrotum because sperm develop best at a temperature several degrees cooler than normal body temperature. The testicles

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Sex and Penile Cancer

Home Urinary Problems Psychological Impact Urinary Catheters Lymphoedema All treatment for penile cancer will alter the appearance of the penis and may affect sexual function. It is very important that both you and your partner are aware of these issues, and work through them together. Men may feel less masculine and worry that they will

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Living with Penile Cancer

Home Psychological Impact Sexual Impact Urinary Catheters Lymphoedema Urinary Problems Surgery or radiotherapy to the penis will cause swelling and inflammation, and this may affect the urethra or “water pipe” causing the urinary stream to spray. It may settle as the penis heals but can sometimes be permanent. Men who have had a total or

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Being diagnosed with penile cancer

Home About Penile Cancer Know your risk Treatments Living With Penile cancer is commonly diagnosed by taking samples of a suspected cancerous area (biopsy) or removing a small area of skin (wide local excision), from the penis. It may also be diagnosed following circumcision (surgical removal of the foreskin). A scientist examines the samples under

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Surgery for Penile Cancer

Home Treating Early Penile Cancer Radiotherapy for Localised Penile Cancer Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for Advanced Penile Cancer Clinical Trials Surgery The aim of all surgery is to preserve as much of the penis as possible while removing all of the cancer. Surgery will change the appearance of your penis and you should discuss how the

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Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for Advanced Penile Cancer

Home Treating Early Penile Cancer Radiotherapy for Localised Penile Cancer Surgery Clinical Trials Radiotherapy and chemotherapy can be used to treat penile cancer which has spread to other areas of the body such as lymph nodes or other organs. This is called metastatic disease. External beam radiotherapy External beam radiotherapy (radiotherapy from outside the body)

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Treating Early Penile Cancer

Home Radiotherapy for Localised Penile Cancer Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for Advanced Penile Cancer Surgery Clinical Trials Topical Treatments (creams) Chemotherapy -5-fluorouracil (Effudex™) This is a type of chemotherapy cream which is applied to the penis for around 4 – 6 weeks. Chemotherapy works by destroying cancer cells but may also affect some healthy cells on

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About the Penis and Penile Cancer

Home Know your risk Diagnosis Treatments Living with Penile Cancer About the Penis The penis is the male sex organ and can be divided into three parts: the root or base of the penis, the body of the penis and the end of the penis (glans penis) which may also be covered by a layer

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Recurrence of Testicular Cancer

Testicular Cancer Living With Fertility Testosterone Replacement Therapy Like all cancers that are cured there is always a risk that testicular cancer may return. Most testicular cancer tends to reoccur within 2-years after initial treatment. Approximately 3% of patients with testicular cancer will develop a cancer in their other testicle. It is therefore very important

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Fatigue in prostate cancer patients – HCP Guide

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Fatigue in prostate cancer patients

REFERENCES Toohey et al., 2022: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9139246/pdf/cancers-14-02452.pdf Horgan et al., 2018: https://www.jmirs.org/article/S1939-8654(17)30369-7/fulltext Kenfield et al, 2022: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41391-022-00509-6 Taaffe et al., 2017: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0302283817301082?via%3Dihub

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Recurrence of prostate cancer

About the Prostate About Prostate Cancer Risks and Symptoms Treatments Living with Prostate Cancer What happens if the cancer comes back? It can be extremely difficult to find out that your cancer has come back. All of the thoughts and feelings you had when you were first diagnosed can come back too. These feelings and

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Living with prostate cancer

Prostate Cancer Risks and Symptoms Treatments About the Prostate Reoccurrence What is it like living with prostate cancer? Living with prostate cancer can affect your everyday life, work, and relationships. You may experience side effects from treatment, even when the treatment has finished, which can affect your physical health. You may also be worried about

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Monitoring prostate cancer

Monitoring means your doctor will keep a close eye on you rather than recommending treatment straight away. You may feel fearful or angry about monitoring your cancer rather than receiving treatment. But all treatments have side effects, and your doctor will not recommend treatment if he or she believes the risks outweigh any benefit you

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Prostate cancer treatments

Monitoring Surgery Hormone Therapy Radio Therapy Chemotherapy Other Treatments What treatments are available for prostate cancer? There are different treatments for prostate cancer. The treatment you are offered will vary depending on your age, overall health, and your tumour’s stage and grade. Your doctor will discuss the results from your diagnostic tests and your treatment

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Prostate cancer tests

What checks and tests are available for prostate cancer? While you may have heard about “screening” for cancer, for example, mammograms to check for breast cancer, not all countries have a prostate cancer screening programme. For this reason, it is very important to get a prostate check if you have any of the known symptoms

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Risk & symptoms of prostate cancer

About the Prostate About Prostate Cancer Treatments Living with Prostate Cancer Reoccurrence What increases the risk of getting prostate cancer? Four main risk factors increase a man’s chance of developing prostate cancer. If you feel you have any risk factors for developing prostate cancer, you should speak to your doctor. Age Age is the biggest

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About prostate cancer

About the Prostate Risks and Symptoms Treatments Living with Prostate Cancer Reoccurrence What is prostate cancer? Our bodies are made up of trillions of tiny cells, which are the basic building blocks of all living things. Cells continuously divide to make new cells. It is how we grow and how the body heals itself. Sometimes

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Cancer at Work – Tips for employers supporting employees with cancer

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Cancer at Work – Tips for employees diagnosed with cancer

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Prostate Cancer Newsletters

On this page, you can find our Prostate Cancer Newsletters. 2021: November July April February 2020: November August May

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Kidney Cancer Newsletters

On this page, you can find our Kidney Cancer Newsletters. 2021: December September May January 2020: October July

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Bladder Cancer Newsletters

On this page, you can find our Bladder Cancer Newsletters. 2021: October June March 2020: December September June

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IKCC Report: The impact of COVID-19 on the kidney cancer community

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EAU21 Kidney cancer Patient Information session – 9 July 2021

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Hormone Therapy and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Prostate Cancer

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Patient Summary Darolutamide and survival in nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer – A Patient perspective of the ARAMIS trial

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EAU21 Treatment sequencing in metastatic prostate cancer

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EAU21 Treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

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EAU21 Metastatic prostate cancer: Systemic treatments and options of loc treatment in oligometastatic disease

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EAU21 Metastatic prostate cancer – Poster Session 29

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EAU21 Guideline Session II: Prostate cancer – cN+ in newly diagnosed patients

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EAU21 Immunotherapy in urothelial cancer

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EAU21 Nephron-sparing treatment in localised kidney cancer

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EAU21 Life After Cancer Treatment PI Session

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EAU21 PIONEER prostate cancer platform

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EAU21 Controversies in Bladder Cancer 2021: Rapid-fire debates

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EAU21 Advanced bladder cancer in 2021: Going forward?

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EAU21 Kidney cancer – Patient Information Session

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EAU21 Bladder cancer – Patient Information Session

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Prostate Cancer Patient Guide (Prostate Cancer Foundation)

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EAU21 Plenary session 04 – Renal cancer: from localised to metastatic disease

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Cost and value of surgery for kidney cancer patients in the USA

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Joint Letter on COVID-19 and Cancer

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How to manage cancer at work – ECL Cancer at Work Handbook

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Hormone Therapy and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Prostate Cancer

About prostate cancer What is the prostate, and what does it do? The prostate is a small gland that forms part of your reproductive system. It is about the size of a golf ball and surrounds the tube that empties urine from your bladder, called the urethra. The prostate makes a thick white fluid that

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Study Mentall Illness and Bladder Cancer Patients

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Full text Living with Prostate Cancer and ADT

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Full text Hypertension and Cardiovascular Morbidity Following Surgery for Kidney Cancer

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Patient Summary full text Patient-Centered Approach to Develop the Patient’s Preferences for Prostate Cancer Care (PreProCare) Tool

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Patient Summary Kidney Cancer Newsletter October 2020

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Patient Summary full text Patient Function and the Value of Surgical Care for Kidney Cancer

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FAQs on COVID-19 and Kidney Cancer

On this page you will find FAQs about COVID-19 and Kidney Cancer. Find more FAQs on our page FAQs about COVID-19. 1 Q: What are some of the renal complications that might arise as a result of COVID-19 infection? A: In most patients COVID-19 infection is minor, but in those admitted to hospital there is

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FAQs on COVID-19 and Prostate Cancer

On this page you will find FAQs about COVID-19 and Prostate Cancer. Find more FAQs on our page FAQs about COVID-19. 1 Q: I am participating in a clinical trial for prostate cancer, what should I know? A: A good place to start is visiting your cancer centre or healthcare professionals’ website. Be mindful of

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FAQs on COVID-19 and Bladder Cancer

On this page you will find FAQs about COVID-19 and Bladder Cancer. Find more FAQs on our page FAQs about COVID-19. 1 Q: What can I do, as a caregiver, to help my loved one who has bladder cancer? A: Here are some active ways to help your loved ones: Remind them of the basic

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Cancers

Urologic cancers are a collection of diseases related to the genitourinary system of both men and women. These diseases are caused by cells that no longer work properly. These abnormal cells grow uncontrolled in the body. Read more about what cancer is on the page 'What is cancer?', and how to cope with cancer. On

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Penile cancer

About the disease Know your risk Diagnosis Treatments Living with Penile Cancer Penile Cancer Penile cancer is very rare. Only 1 man in 100,000 will be affected and roughly 36,000 men will be diagnosed globally each year. It is most often diagnosed in men over the age of 60 years, but younger men can also

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Urachal cancer

What is the urachus? The urachus is a tube-like structure that forms in a developing embryo. It connects the umbilical cord to the urinary bladder before birth. After birth, the urachus usually shrinks into a small ligament. However, traces of the urachus (called urachal residues) can be detected in up to one-third of adults. Urachal

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Testicular cancer

About Testicular Cancer Risk Factors and Diagnosis Treatments Living with Recurrence Testicular Self Examination (TSE) TSE can identify testicular problems including cancer. It can be performed in a bath or shower when the scrotum is warm and relaxed. Each testicle should be checked separately using both hands (see diagram). The thumb and fingers can be

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Prostate cancer

Prostate Cancer Risks and Symptoms Treatments Living with Prostate Cancer Reoccurrence What is the prostate? The prostate is a small gland that forms part of a man’s reproductive system. It is about the size of a golf ball and surrounds the tube that empties urine from the bladder, called the urethra. It is normal for

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Primary urethral cancer

What is primary urethral cancer? You have been diagnosed with primary urethral cancer. This means you have a cancerous growth (malignant tumour) in your urethra. The urethra carries urine out of the body from the bladder, also known as urinary bladder. In men, the urethra runs through the prostate and the penis (Fig. 1). In women,

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Kidney cancer

What is kidney cancer? Kidney cancer is a malignant cell growth (a tumour) in the kidneys. Its medical name is renal cell carcinoma. A tumour in the kidney can also be benign (non-cancerous). Kidney cancer is a general term. There are many variations of tumours in the kidney and stages of the disease. Your treatment and

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Bladder cancer

What is bladder cancer? [glossary_exclude]Bladder[/glossary_exclude] cancer is the growth of abnormal tissue (tumour) in the bladder. There are several stages of bladder cancer. Your treatment and experience will depend on the specific characteristics of the tumour (referred to as “staging” the tumour) and the expertise of your medical team. This section provides general information about

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Surgery for urachal cancer

Tumour removal Surgery is recommended to remove a urachal cancer tumour that has not spread to other tissues or organs. The tumour will be removed along with surrounding tissue in the abdomen, the navel, and the top of the bladder to make sure no cancer cells remain. In rare cases, some or all of the

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European Code Against Cancer

12 ways to reduce your cancer risk The European Code Against Cancer (ECAC) is an initiative of the European Commission, developed by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The ECAC aims to inform people about actions they can take for themselves or their families to reduce their risk of cancer.

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Treatment of penis cancer

This section offers general information. Your specific treatment will be recommended by your doctor based on your individual needs. Individual recommendations may depend on your country and health care system. The treatment you have will depend on: what you prefer what your doctor thinks is best for your type of cancer which treatments are available

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An improved approach to prostate cancer

Europa Uomo chairman André Deschamps sets out the need for an improved approach to prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. 30 million men in Europe are confronted with a diagnosis of prostate cancer in their lifetime. Each year 75,000 men die from prostate cancer. A questionnaire amongst our members in 24 European states showed that: Less

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Cancer survivorship

Cancer survivorship has traditionally received little prioritisation and attention. For a long time, the treatment of cancer has been the main focus of healthcare providers’ efforts. It is time to increase the amount of attention given to patients’ long-term well-being and their ability to return to a productive and good life. This article describes the

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Treatment of locally advanced primary urethral cancer

Preoperative chemotherapy Different types of urethral cancer are treated differently. Some urethral cancer, called urothelial carcinoma, specifically affects urothelial cells. Chemotherapy followed by surgery is critical to remove urothelial carcinoma. Chemotherapy that contains platinum (eg, cisplatin, carboplatin) is most effective against urethral cancer. Chemotherapy combinations like MVAC (which uses the drugs methotrexate, vinblastine, Adriamycin [doxorubicin],

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Treatment for women with localised urethral cancer

Primary radical urethrectomy Your doctor will recommend complete removal of the urethra (urethrectomy), including part of the bladder and the surrounding tissue to ensure the highest chance of cure. Usually, the bladder neck is closed during the procedure, and a new way to store and regulate the flow of urine is created (urinary diversion). Urethra-sparing

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Treatment of primary urethral cancer

Localised urethral cancer Localised primary urethral cancer is confined to the urethra. Treatment for men and women differs. Your doctor will recommend a treatment that aims to remove all cancer and preserve your quality of life. To do this, the location of the tumour is important. Treatment for men localised urethral cancer Treatment for women

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Treatment for men with localised urethral cancer

Partial urethrectomy Partial urethrectomy: If your cancer is limited to the part of the urethra nearest the opening, but still close to the tip, partial removal of the urethra (urethrectomy) with penile preservation may be the best option. Your doctor might also recommend removal of enlarged lymph nodes to rule out metastasis. The main goal

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Radiation therapy castration-resistant prostate cancer

Castration-resistant prostate cancer can be managed with radiation therapy. The radiation damages and kills cancer cells. The treatment will help to relieve pain and may allow you to live longer. Common side effects are a burning sensation when you urinate, urinary frequency, and anal irritation.

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Chemotherapy castration-resistant prostate cancer

Chemotherapy with docetaxel Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses chemicals to destroy cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs can be injected into the bloodstream to attack cells throughout the body. They can also be applied directly to the tumour. Your doctor may recommend the chemotherapy docetaxel to manage castration-resistant prostate cancer. The drug relieves

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Immunotherapy castration-resistant prostate cancer

Immunotherapy is a type of treatment that uses your own immune system to fight the tumour cells. In prostate cancer the drug Sipuleucel-T is used as immunotherapy. Because your own blood is used to prepare the drug, you need to get blood drawn before the procedure. Immunotherapy is administered through an IV, in an outpatient

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Treatment of urachal cancer

Urachal cancer is often diagnosed at later stages. Based on your disease stage and predicted outcomes, recommended treatment may include: Surgery Chemotherapy Palliative care Recommended treatment and predicted outcomes will be based on your cancer stage. The planned treatment approach should be discussed by a multidisciplinary tumour board. This board is made up of practitioners

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Treatment of testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is usually treated with surgery. The testicle must be removed (orchiectomy) to remove the cancer (Fig. 1). The tissue may be examined during surgery to confirm the diagnosis and stage. Additional surgery, drug treatment (chemotherapy), or radiation therapy also may be needed. Fig. 1: Orchiectomy—incision in the groin area. Surgery to remove the

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Hormonal therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

Hormonal therapy is a treatment option for metastatic prostate cancer. It aims to slow down the growth of the tumours. The growth of prostate cancer cells is dependent on male sex hormones called androgens. Testosterone is the most important androgen. Androgens are mainly produced in the testicles. Hormonal therapy either stops the production of androgens,

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Drug treatment for metastatic kidney cancer

Drug treatment is a common option for metastatic kidney cancer. There are several types of treatment: Antiangiogenic therapy, commonly described as targeted therapy Immunotherapy Chemotherapy, in combination with immunotherapy These drugs influence the mechanisms that tumours use to grow. All decisions about the right therapy for you are taken after careful consideration of your general

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Treatment of metastatic kidney cancer

Kidney tumours can spread to other organs or distant lymph nodes. This is called metastatic disease. In metastatic disease, the kidney tumour is referred to as the primary tumour and the tumours in other organs are called metastases. Your doctor may recommend to treat metastatic disease with surgery, usually in combination with antiangiogenic therapy, also

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Treatment of locally-advanced kidney cancer

What is locally-advanced kidney cancer? Locally-advanced kidney cancer refers to a tumour which has spread to or beyond the blood vessels, tissue, organs, or lymph nodes surrounding the kidney. It may be a stage III or IV tumour, depending on how far outside the kidney the tumour has spread. If you are diagnosed with locally-advanced

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Treatment of localised kidney cancer

What is localised kidney cancer? Localised kidney cancer refers to a tumour which is limited to the kidney and has not extended to other parts of your body. It may be a stage I or II tumour, depending on its size (Fig 1 and 2). If you are diagnosed with localised kidney cancer, your doctor

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Active surveillance kidney cancer

Active surveillance is a form of treatment for localised kidney cancer in which the doctor actively monitors the tumour. It is recommended if surgery is not the best option for you and you have a tumour in your kidney which is smaller than 4 cm. Some of the reasons why your doctor may say you

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Treatment of recurrent prostate cancer

It is possible that prostate cancer comes back after you have been treated. This is known as recurrence. The cancer may come back in the prostate, in tissue around the prostate or pelvic lymph nodes, or in other parts of the body. The follow-up treatment pathway depends on where the cancer is. Your doctor will

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Treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

What is castration-resistant prostate cancer? Castration-resistant prostate cancer is a type of prostate cancer that usually develops during treatment for metastatic disease. Hormonal therapy either stops the production or blocks the action of androgens. This is known as castration. When effective, hormonal therapy stops the growth of the tumour. This effect will not last and

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Treatment of metastatic prostate cancer

What is metastatic disease? Prostate cancer can spread to other organs or lymph nodes outside the pelvic area. This is called metastatic disease. The tumours in other organs or lymph nodes are called metastases. Your doctor may recommend treating metastatic disease with hormonal therapy. It is important to realise that metastatic disease cannot be cured.

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Treatment of locally-advanced prostate cancer

What is locally-advanced prostate cancer? Locally-advanced prostate cancer refers to a tumour which has spread outside of the prostate. It may be a T3 or T4 tumour, depending on where and how far outside of the prostate it has grown. T3 means that the tumour has grown just outside the prostate or to the seminal

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